Jennet Thomas

Annette Robinson (visual artist) presented the outcome of her residency with Belinda Wild (theatre director); an experiment in responding to each other’s practices. Taking some of the ideas in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot as a starting point, Robinson and Wild explored “mutual registers” and common threads, developing a series of actions and reactions both to the space and each other. Robinson set up an installation which Wild (working with students) translated into actions, which Robinson then incorporated back into the installation, which students then re-activated a few days later. Through a series of acts and re-acts , layering up the live and the recorded, and working with sound, visuals and movement, Robinson and Wild animated the space over time.

Annette Robinson & Belinda Wild's piece in Wimbledon Space

Annette Robinson & Belinda Wild’s piece in Wimbledon Space

Jennet-Thomas

I am your error message by Jennet Thomas

I am your error message, a film and live performance by Jennet Thomas explored the notion of a spreading “error” and the action required in order to reach “the daytime place where everything is safe”. Entering into a live dialogue with her video, which posed a series of questions about “the error” and the path to salvation, Thomas’s performance functioned as a commentary about bureaucratic systems, and the type of capitalist reward structures used to ensure conformity and compliance. Thomas’s performance was immediately followed by This is Time, by Paul Tarrago. Working entirely with analogue production methods Tarrago generated a metafictional narrative via the interplay of 16mm film with a live soundtrack combining his own voice and a record player.

This is Time by Paul Tarrago

This is Time by Paul Tarrago

Rossella Emanuele’s performance

Rossella Emanuele’s performance

Rossella Emanuele‘s performance examined the relationship between drawing and dance “in an attempt to give structure to primordial experiences of language, the self and the body”. Via a performance incorporating live dance/drawing, sound and video projections, Emanuele explored dance as a form of notation, tasking a dancer with creating a certain formation/pattern of marks by the end of the performance, and seeing how this affected the dance and gestures that then occurred.

Rossella Emanuele’s performance

Rossella Emanuele’s performance

Hanae Utamura's performance CONSTRUCT: Re-act

Hanae Utamura’s performance CONSTRUCT: Re-act

Hanae Utamura‘s performance CONSTRUCT: Re-act explored processes of making and un-making. The performance saw Utamuna respond to a projection of an earlier video performance she’d made, CONSTRUCT (2012) (itself an exploration of making un-making) by painting over the projection surface with black paint and a roller. Rather than obliterating the original film, Utamura’s act effected a further transformation of the original work.

Hanae Utamura's performance CONSTRUCT: Re-act

Hanae Utamura’s performance CONSTRUCT: Re-act

The festival continues at Wimbledon Space until 26 March with public events occurring on Tuesdays and Wednesdays each week.  The upcoming programme includes a range of performances, films, installations, residencies, artist talks, and seminars from fine art and theatre and the ambiguous space between.

This post, including all images, was by Trish Scott.

To find out more about postgraduate and research study at Wimbledon College of Arts, please visit our course pages.