Journalism at London College of Communication is known for being as close to on-the-job learning as it gets, teaching the skills and knowledge in print, online and broadcast journalism. The course offers the opportunity to work on Artefact, the Programme area’s own print magazine, and put students’ skills straight into practice in our industry-standard, multimedia newsroom.

As part of LCC Degree Shows 2017: Media School, graduating students from BA (Hons) Journalism, BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing (now BA (Hons) Magazine Journalism & Publishing) and BA (Hons) Sports Journalism are taking over LCC Studio in the Elephant & Castle Shopping Centre – showing work to industry, friends, and members of the public.

We caught up with some of the Journalism students as their time at LCC comes to an end…

Aurore Kaddachi

BA (Hons) Journalism

Why did you choose to study a degree in Journalism?

As cliche as it sounds, I always wanted to study journalism since the age of 12 or so. I remember watching a television reportage on TV with my mother about a social crisis in Eastern Africa and I thought to myself: “this is it, that’s what I want to do!!!”. I thought that the only way I could help others on a grand scale and raise awareness in our Western societies was through the media.

I decided to study at LCC because out of all the programs proposed by other universities in London, LCC offered the most practical training. I am glad I came to LCC because all my creative skills were encouraged by my tutors throughout my degree.

Why do you think Journalism is important?

As stated in my previous answer, I do believe that journalism has always been a great tool, if not the greatest, to gather and deliver stories to society based on reliable sources. Even though today corruption and technological advancements have changed and shaped journalism, it remains an important channel to form opinions and raise awareness. I believe that journalism has the ability to change the world.

What is your preferred style of journalism?

Investigative journalism is definitely my favourite form of journalism. I do enjoy in-depth reporting because I do trust journalists and I know these reports usually provide their audience with reliable and checked information.

Now that I am about to graduate I understand how much work and planning is put into investigations so I respect that. No matter what the risks are, investigative journalists aim to expose wrongdoings and stand up to pressure and I think that’s the core of journalism. I personally aim to enter the broadcasting side of journalism, television and documentary making.

What are your career ambitions once you leave LCC?

I am currently looking for a paid internship in broadcasting, ideally in multimedia production. I am feeling pretty confident, as LCC has introduced us to all different areas of the journalism field.

How do you think your time at LCC has helped you develop as a journalist?

Everything! From the facilities, the seminars and even its location. I have to say that my tutors were incredibly supportive and without them I wouldn’t feel so confident about my skills and what I am able to do.

Follow Aurore on Twitter.

James Cropper

BA (Hons) Journalism

Why did you choose to study a degree in Journalism?

It felt like an opportunity to make a contribution to public discourse and essentially get my voice heard within society. I only got interested in journalism aged 18, which was down to predominant factors.
The first simply involved my old college tutor approaching me to say he saw potential in my writing.

Shortly after this, then PM David Cameron hosted the G8 summit Northern Ireland, where I’m from. The prospect of this appealed to me and within a few days I was down in the centre of Belfast covering Barrack Obama’s visit for a YouTube channel. I began to mingle with journalists who had descended from across the world to cover the event.

This allowed me to experience what it felt like to be positioned on the ground at an important world event, which is a feeling that I slowly became hooked on. This led me to apply for a place to study journalism at LCC, which I chose mainly because of its interesting programme and central location.

Why do you think Journalism is important?

Journalism is a crucial element of any democratic society as it provides people with information and knowledge that ultimately influence’s public discourse. It is crucial for good journalism to exist within society, as without such information we wouldn’t be able to make sense of the world around us.

During my time at LCC journalism’s importance within society has been made even more crucial we have been constantly bombarded with fake news. This really leaves journalists within a position to guarantee that society receives real, cemented facts.

What area of journalism do you hope to work in in the future?

My focus lies within video journalism as it allows you to actually get out into the field and meet such a variety of people. This was a strong ambition of mine upon arriving in London so during my time studying at LCC I’ve made a constant effort to report on stories physically and have met some great people in the process.

That would be probably be my main bit of advice for any current or prospective journalism students as by getting yourself to every possible event you’ll eventually create a strong network of contacts. These contacts could end up being really important in your journalistic career.

The rise of online journalism has, from my experience, limited the time that editorial journalists actually have to report on stories physically. This is something that I like to avoid, as the prospect of sitting in an office all day isn’t something I would like to be faced with.

What work are you featuring as part of LCC Degree Shows?

I’m featuring a short documentary that I produced for my final major project, which is based around the concept of modern day poverty in British seaside towns. It’s set in the small Essex town of Harwich.

The current poverty situation in Harwich was shocking to see with my own eyes. Each day I visited the town’s food bank desperate people were queuing to receive parcels as a lack of money had left them in a position of not being able to afford basic living essentials.

A specific focus is placed on a man called Phil who at the time of filming was in a really dire living condition. With his benefits capped at a fortnightly fee of £15, which is only granted if he pays a £9 return daily bus journey to the nearest jobcentre (a journey that takes nearly 2 hours) Phil has been completely forgotten by the system.

These people have just been forgotten by politicians and the rest of society, which is hopefully where my role as a journalist came in as I was able to highlight the town’s problems, which are unfortunately all too common across Britain’s coast.

What are your career ambitions once you leave LCC?

I’m hoping to break into the industry as a video journalist. A long-term goal would be to become a foreign correspondent. I can’t think of anything better than being able to experience different cultures and be on the ground at potentially monumental world events.

For the meantime though I am aiming for my journalistic work to be produced around a focus of areas of Britain that are often forgotten about by London based news organisations. While it’s obviously hard to ignore the amount of things that happen in London, there is an entirely different country out there, which needs to be heard.

As a working class person I almost feel obliged to highlight how the governmental cuts and other factors are having such a damaging effect on people throughout the country. So there’s a good chance that I’ll end up in other towns like Harwich across Britain over the next few years.

How do you think your time at LCC has helped you develop as a journalist?

I’ve really enjoyed my time as a student at LCC and without the past three years I don’t think I’d have been half the journalist that I am today. For example, the opportunity to be taught by tutors who share such a vast range of experience within the journalistic industry has been an extremely valuable tool to develop skills.

As the third year of our course involved the production of a magazine it was great to be able to see our work in print and being read across the university. There wasn’t a better feeling than seeing someone in the university pick up the magazine a pay attention to something that you had worked hard on creating

The tutors have also used their connections to arrange some really insightful talks from industry professionals, which has allowed myself and classmates to meet and learn from individuals working at the Guardian, Vice, BBC etc.

In addition, the chance to undertake an internship as part of the course’s 2nd year was a really great way to further my skills. I was lucky enough to use my Irish roots to get working at a paper called the Irish Post, which saw my work go in print across the country. The paper also invited me back to do some freelance shifts after the internship so it’s an example of how the course allowed me to make some strong contacts.

Follow James on Twitter.

Naveena Patel

BA (Hons) Journalism

Why did you choose to study a degree in Journalism and at LCC?

I’ve always wanted to have a career within the radio broadcasting industry, but I thought it would be a better idea to choose a degree that would open more doors than just one.

I heard of UAL through a family member who also graduated from there. After doing some research on the curriculum I made UAL my top choice.

Why do you think Journalism is important?

We find out about what’s happening in the world through journalism, whether serious global news or light-hearted entertainment. Journalism is important as it’s important to know about the world.

What is your preferred style and area of journalism?

Broadcast journalism – since I talk a lot.

In the near future I hope to become a broadcast journalist within the area of entertainment and music. I currently interview musicians and bloggers about their life for my website.

What work are you featuring as part of LCC Degree Shows, and could you tell us a little about it?

I wrote an article, featured in Artefact Magazine, about an upcoming rapper, Knucks.
This focuses on the rapper’s life while growing up and what he wants to achieve in the future.

I remember when it got released on the print version of the magazine. I got a lot of positive feedback from it which was really motivating.

What are your career ambitions once you leave LCC?

I tend to dip in and out different freelance writing and radio roles and hope to get involved in different projects and see what my strengths and weaknesses are and to find out what I enjoy doing most.

How do you think your time at LCC has helped you develop as a journalist?

My time at LCC has helped me develop as a journalist by allowing me to gain necessary skills through projects. I’ve also developed on my confidence and people skills hugely.

The advice that I have received from teachers and tutors has been great, it’s really pushed me in the right direction and motivated me.

Follow Naveena on Twitter.

Fabiana De Giorgio

BA (Hons) Journalism

Why did you choose to study a degree in Journalism at LCC?

I have always been curious about realities that were very different from mine and I had a strong passion for writing. I thought that with journalism I could bring together those interests. I chose LCC because I liked the idea of studying in an arts university surrounded by a creative environment.

Why do you think Journalism is important?

I think journalism holds a fundamental role in society because it is the main means of information for the public. It is essential for the function of democracy as it should serves the citizens by monitoring the decision-makers in a given society.

What area of journalism do you hope to work in in the future?

Feature writing is my preferred style of written journalism. In the future I would like to in TV broadcasting.

What work are you featuring as part of LCC Degree Shows?

I am featuring two articles which are: Latin London under threat and Sharia law though women’s eyes. The first piece is about the Latin American community of Seven Sisters in North London. In particular, it explores the controversies regarding the possible demolishment of Pueblito Paisa market, a point of reference for many South Americans.

“Journalism holds a fundamental role in society because it is the main means of information for the public. It is essential for the function of democracy as it should serves the citizens by monitoring the decision-makers in a given society.” — Fabiana De Giorgio

The second feature, ‘Sharia Law through women’s eyes’ is an investigation into Sharia law in the UK. The piece gives an insight into the role of Sharia courts in this country. It presents testimonies and different views on a subject that still remains quite secretive.

As a third piece I chose a video called ‘The rite of pain’. This is about Female Genital Mutilation and this video has the aim of informing young people about this horror that unfortunately still happens in London. In this piece in collaboration with my classmate Aurore Kaddachi I have interviewed experts in the subject of FGM.

How do you think your time at LCC has helped you develop as a journalist?

My time at LCC has helped me to develop myself both as a journalist and as an individual. The incredible support that I have received from my teachers has been essential for my personal growth.

Follow Fabiana on Twitter.