With Degree Show Two: Design now closed, we take a look back at our students’ final projects and the inspirations behind them.

BA Jewellery Design Bam Jansanjai’s final collection How to Wear Good Luck reinvents 13 old superstitions. Interested in the value and spiritual significance we afford to objects, Jansanjai’s collection is a series of positive jewellery items which bring good luck to their wearer. Humans have adorned themselves with amulets and charms since ancient times; people carry small objects with them in accordance with their beliefs. While these objects give a sense of comfort, protection and even fortune, they are often seen as outdated, overly serious or sacred. In How to Wear Good Luck, Jansanjai reworks the superstitious object for a younger generation, creating contemporary, ritual objects. Here she talks us through five pieces from her lucky collection and how to wear them to bring you good fortune.

Bam Jansanjai, How to Wear Good Luck, II ( _ ) Loves Me, 2018

1. II (_) Loves Me

Description: The person you are secretly in love with will start to notice you. You will also be loved by everyone because this flower says so.

Origins and beliefs: This game Euffeuiller la Marguerite is of French origin. A flower offers the answer! The first petal says “He/She loves me”. The second petal says “He/She loves me not”. Pick all the petals from the flower, the final petal will tell you “He/She loves me.” Or not…

Area of belief: Worldwide

How to wear the good luck: Pin

Bam Jansanjai, How to Wear Good Luck, VI Salt over Shoulder, 2018

2. VI Salt over Shoulder

Description: No evil can attack you anymore because you “salt” lies “over” your “shoulder”.

Origins and beliefs: Salt is used to make holy water in the Roman Catholic Church; it is a religious symbol of sanctity, associated with exorcism. A variety of methods are used to thwart the evil omen of spilt salt. The most common is to toss a pinch of the salt over your left shoulder, into the face of the Devil who lurks there.

Area of belief: Christian

How to wear the good luck: Shoulder brooch – wear it on left shoulder because the evil only hangs around behind your left shoulder, waiting to take advantage of you.

Bam Jansanjai, How to Wear Good Luck, VII Lucky Cat, 2018

3. VII Lucky Cat

Description: Isn’t it good to be able to call upon good luck wherever you go? Wear this lucky cat brooch with its moving cat hand to attract all the good things!

Origins and beliefs: Lucky cat (Maneki-neko) first appeared during the late Edo period in Japan. The Japanese believe that a cat washing its face means a visitor will soon arrive. This lucky cat can be found in many shops and restaurants in everyday life.

Area of belief: Japan and Asian countries

How to wear the good luck: Brooch

Bam Jansanjai, How to Wear Good Luck, X Inside Out, 2018

4. X Inside Out

Description: You can now wear your top inside out without embarrassing yourself and get XL (Extra Luck) for the whole day!

Origins and beliefs: It is a sign of extreme good fortune if you put on your clothes the wrong way around. If this happens, you shouldn’t change it back and instead wear it incorrectly the whole day. Then you will soon after receive a windfall or some very favourable news; your luck is about to change for better.

Area of belief: Europe

How to wear the good luck: Necklace

Bam Jansanjai, How to Wear Good Luck, XIII Fingers Crossed, 2018

5. XIII Finger Crossed

Description: Keep your fingers crossed all day round. No matter where you go, with this ring, bad luck will never come near you – you are protected!

Origins and beliefs: Crossing one’s fingers is commonly associated with good luck. It was used when ancient Christians were persecuted – believers used it to identify other believers as a sign of peace.

Area of belief: Western World

How to wear the good luck: Ring

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