Student Profile and Alu Tree by Omer Even-Paz, BA Fine Art

Alu Tree by Omer Even Paz

Alu Tree by Omer Even Paz

Did you see it in passing, possibly from or to Tate Britain or Millbank Tower? The tree with aluminium leaves? Chelsea’s Rootstein Hopkins parade ground recently saw one of it’s autumnal trees regaining leaves, reversing the natural phenomenon of leaves falling as winter takes its grip. The new leaves however were not green but instead silver! BA Fine Art student Omer Even Paz from Israel tells us a little more about himself and this magical project.

Alu Tree

Alu Tree

Describe your Chelsea experience in 3 words?

Free, Open & Self-Reflective.

What do you enjoy most about studying at Chelsea?

The workshops, which absolutely help you achieve every dream you have!

A Collation of real and artificial leaves Omer made including Steel, Aluminium and wood.

A Collation of real and artificial leaves Omer made including Steel, Aluminium and wood.

How are you enjoying living in London?

It’s amazing, inspiring and hard at times. Such a huge city and so diverse. There’s so much to see that it easy to feel that you’ll never know or do enough. Settling in takes time but it’s the beginning of an exciting journey.

Where do you live?

North east.

What’s your neighbourhood like?

Very quite and suburban. Everything closes by 8pm. There is something very nice about that actually. It allows me to stay much more focused then if I have lived in Brick Lane or another really busy neighbourhood.

What are your greatest achievements/awards/exhibitions?

The installation I made that shows here at Chelsea – Alu Tree:

The leaves kept falling here ever since I arrived to London. It is the theme of autumn of course but for me it’s my first European autumn. I tried to find ways to recreate or express those feelings I got since I came here but in a way that others could feel too. I made hundreds and thousands of metal foil leaves and attached them with rusted metal wire to the Oriental Plane Tree outside the college buildings on our parade ground. Unlike the real leaves my artificial leaves were too weak and ripped away with every passing gust of wind. It was a foreknown failure to the cold and breezy winter day. Soon enough my tree was bare like all his fellows in the street. But for those hours when the leaves where there, many of the people that passed under the metal shivering tree, stopped for a minute or two, and maybe took a leaf from the ground, possibly with wonderment.

What do you see yourself doing after your studies?

Practicing art, study history and literature and teaching in a high school.

And lastly, what would you say to anyone thinking of doing your course?

If you are thinking about practicing art and looking for a good place to explore yourself and your practice Chelsea is the place.

Read more about this interesting project on Omer’s blog.

ADVENTURES IN TYPE Exhibition

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BA Graphic Design Communication students are currently instrumental in inspiring creativity during meal times at Chelsea Canteen. This highly visually appealing display of work from their type project brief is well worth popping into Chelsea for if you’re passing by. Original new typefaces are also available to download for free. See the course blog Brighter Chelsea for full details. The exhibition will run until the end of this week.

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Student Profile: Maryam Saleemi, FdA Interior Design

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2nd Year FdA Interior Design student Maryam Saleemi talks to us about the course and the college.

Whats your name?

Maryam Saleemi

Where are you from?

Born in London, parents from East Africa

What course are you studying?

I am in the final year of the Foundation Degree (FdA) Interior Design and am applying for Architecture this year, starting Sep 2015

Describe your Chelsea experience in 3 words?

Scenic, Great Contacts, Amazing resources

What do you enjoy most about studying at Chelsea?

I’ve made life long friends from all over the world

How are you enjoying living in London?

I love it! I’ve lived here my whole life.

Where do you live?

Brockley, South East London

Whats your neighbourhood like?

My local area use to be a little rough, but it has greatly improved. There are so many creative, quirky people and cafes around. I wouldn’t want to move unless it was temporary, it’s my home!

What has been your greatest challenge so far on the course and how have you overcome it?

I think I have found it hard being so independent with my learning as I have always had a very close bond with all my Art teachers, ever since primary school. Yet I have learnt that this is how we get trained to go and work in industry, out in the big world.  I have also found it extremely hard to portray my ideas graphically. However I had a 1-2-1 session with an illustrator pro (teacher), who was AMAZING! When I came out I couldn’t stop thinking about Illustrator and how much I wanted to go and play with all the tools she showed me. This has given me a lot more confidence.

What has been your greatest achievement on the course.

My work was shown in a public exhibition and put into a catalogue. I am currently working on a live project which is based in Brentford, West London. We have been given a site between the Golden Mile and Brentford High Street. Working on the regeneration of the area and specifically the high street, this project is aimed at bringing the community of Brentford together and re-activating the dying high street.

I am concentrating on the concept of ‘leisure’ and combining this with the Water and Steam Museum; which is very popular among the locals. I am thinking of using processes such as Filtration and Biofuel. BUT to see the finished product you are going to have to come to my end of year show in June!

What do you see yourself doing after your studies?

I would like to be an Architect/Designer and open up my own children’s home or going to do some charity work abroad in less economically developed countries. I would also like to do some traveling.

And lastly, what would you say to anyone thinking of doing your course?

My course is for those who:

  1. Are interested in practical work as opposed to more conceptual work
  2. Want to go straight into industry, and use this course to build a great portfolio.
  3. OR would like to get a foundation degree and then transfer to the Interior and Spatial Design and get a BA as well. Meaning you will get 2 qualifications in 3 years, which is great! This course puts you in a good position with skills whether you choose to go onto the BA or into industry.

You get very educated teachers and you learn a lot if you are willing to put hard work in, and are determined to reach your goals.  GOOD LUCK!

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You can see more of Maryam’s work on her blog: http://5elementdesign.tumblr.com/

You can find out more about the FdA Interior Design course on our website.

 

Student Profile – Hannah Miles, BA Textile Design Year 2

Colour Project by Hannah Miles

Colour Project inspired by Hannah Miles time volunteering in an African village in summer 2014

BA Textile Design students recently displayed their talent in the most vibrant ways through their Colour project and exhibition at Chelsea. Second year student, Hannah Miles, originally from St. Albans, is one of our student ambassadors. She tells us about her Chelsea experience, her very colourful practice and life as a Textile Design student here at Chelsea.

Describe your Chelsea experience in 3 words?

Explore, Develop, Create!

What do you enjoy most about studying at Chelsea?

The flexibility of my course. In first year we had the chance to experiment with the 4 key areas of textiles (print, knit, weave and stitch), and had projects across fashion, interiors and installation. The course has such a broad grounding, and even as you specialise by 2nd year, the open-ended nature of the briefs, allows you to interpret them through your own interests, and create work that is personal to you as a developing designer, and also as an individual. So far I have made garments, accessories, and even a community installation at my local bus stop.

Community bus stop floral installation piece, with floral digital print design for the bus shelter by Hannah Miles

Community bus stop floral installation piece, with floral digital print design for the bus shelter by Hannah Miles

I find this variety really engages me as a designer. I also love the friendly atmosphere at Chelsea. People are generally very constructive and supportive, and you feel like your peers and tutors want to see you develop and grow in your work, rather than putting you down unnecessarily. There is an emphasis on experimentation and trying things, even if they don’t produce the perfect outcome. You learn so many skills and use them to improve your practice. I think this kind of environment is highly valuable.

How are you enjoying living in London?

It’s an amazing place for inspiration through endless museums, galleries and exhibitions. Chelsea College’s location in Pimlico is lovely by the river, with central London within easy reach, and yet set back in this tranquil space where you can think and create. Being opposite the Tate and having daily access to their latest exhibitions is a bonus, too! I love sitting at the top of a London bus to travel, and just watching the city bustle by beneath me. Of course it can be overwhelming at times, but there is such energy and life here.

Where do you live?

Stockwell, Southwest London.

What’s your neighbourhood like?

It’s really convenient for college, either by bus or tube, so a lot of students on my course live in this area of London. I like taking walks to Brixton market, or to the green open space at Clapham Common. Stockwell is also really well located to get quickly into central London. I was amazed how quick it was the first time I took the tube to Oxford Circus in around 10 minutes!

What has been your greatest challenge so far on the course and how have you overcome it?

One of my greatest challenges has been in trusting my own process. I often find I have a lot of ideas at the start of the project, and it is knowing what to run with, and what to let go. You have to learn to trust that your instinct of what will work, and to believe that if you try your best, it will be enough. I’ve also had some health issues since starting university, but the support services here are helpful in making sure that people and systems are in place, so that any needs you have are supported alongside your studies.

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Guest Blog: On Guinea Pigs, Gardens and New York

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This month we welcome a guest blog from 3rd Year BA Fine Art student Joey Phinn who tells us about her semester on exchange at Parsons The New School of Design in New York:

I started off the second term of my second year at Chelsea by rudely jettisoning off to another country: New York, New York, the concrete jungle. I expected the long, aching flight, the frosty immigration arrival at Newark Airport, even the snow. That is, I anticipated snow. I did not anticipate snow-in-New-York. My flight was the last one to evade the long line of cancelled and delayed planes at Heathrow but four hours later, having tottered with a military backpack, canvas bag and woefully un-functional sports shoes into blizzarding Brooklyn, I wasn’t sure I could be considered lucky. Until, of course, I finally found, after wandering in circles, the right apartment I was supposed to couchsurf at. (If you don’t know what couchsurfing is, it is what happens when you hobo it on someone’s couch and offer food, interesting company and culture in exchange for a lack of bed bugs.) Dan opened the door at midnight and announced: hey man, you made it! I plopped down on his sofa and slept for two hours until his housemates came back from their night out. I believe we had a semi-coherent conversation before he invited two random snow shovelers up to our flat to have coffee in the kitchen at 6AM. This is it, I thought. This must be what New York is like.

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Even two weeks later, when I graduated from couch to leaking airbed in an otherwise flawlessly empty room in a five floor brownstone near Franklin Avenue, I maintained a delusionally cheerful disposition by investing belief in the power of This-Must-Be-What-New York-Is-Like. I went on Craigslist. The only free items near me included a used beach towel and a Lasinov breast pump that needed fixing. I clicked on the next listing. Broken umbrella in Manhattan that can still be used, it read. It was OK. This was New York. It is as they say: fake it till you make it. I filled my room with vintage store finds, a pink cyber fairy lamp, a shiftily installed shelf that I propped up with a cinderblock from the garden – and as a final touch: a free leather sofa I convinced my friend Harry to drive me across town to get.

My fantastically weird and interesting housemates and I organised house dinners. We had garden day, when we planted grass seeds and pointedly refused to believe the grass could flourish under the persistent coat of frost – and yet, it did. We added fairy lights, and a guinea pig with mad scientist hair. She looked dictatorial: we called her Überschwein Pigochet. I fell in love (not with the pig), and joined the newly formed music label Kolourbridge making painted album covers.

As for the actual reason I was in New York, exchanging at Parsons: I don’t think I’ve ever made a better decision in my life, even if I had to cry in front of the fireworks to get there. They let me pick whatever classes I wanted, so I took two 4D illustration classes, Sound Art, Video Production and Material Spectrum, which was full of intimidating students who knew how to solder and code and actual useful things. I made more videos than I had ever before – possibly because, you know, I actually had to or I would fail (an American education technique that is bizarrely useful in getting your butt into gear). I animated a polymer clay tacobot in Dragonframe, I learned how to dissect 2D layers in 3D space in After Effects, a program that now dictates most of my video making. I made 3D shapes in Autodesk Maya and 3D printed them, as well as importing the .obj into an audio-visualisation program called Magic and experimented with creating sound-based net sculptures. I made a Party in a Party Store, based around ideas about consumption and the production of labour. We researched how to grow mycelium, made a pencil that would make a squeaky sound when you pressed the lead, and fabricated bioplastics (and blogged about it). And we had some fun finals, even if the Material Spectrum one was in an abandoned looking building in the middle of Brooklyn with incredibly scary, empty corridors and a humming bathroom painted green.

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Translations Show Image Gallery – BA Fine Art 3rd Year

Guest blogger Joey Phinn, BA Fine Art student tells us about the 3rd year interim show ‘Translations’ which went on at the end of November:

Our recent third year Translations exhibition took over the Triangle Space, Cookhouse, Morgue and DLG13 to display a great variety of exciting works, ranging from sculpture to painting to video to performance.

Our private view was a great success, and because we took it upon ourselves to curate our show into different spaces as much as possible we generated a lively discussion between works that allowed the viewers to move naturally between the exhibiting rooms, where stationary pieces were punctuated by dynamic, timed performances, including a spectacular window display by Stephen Eyre (complete with ginger locks and come-hither gestures) and Liberty Hodes’ fantastically well-received performance in the Triangle Space, which utilised charming painted cutouts and old-school voiceovers to create a visual experience that was both engaging and entertaining.

ON TO GARDEN by Joey Phinn

ON TO GARDEN by Joey Phinn

My work ON TO GARDEN consisted of a small greenhouse in the darkened space of DLG13, where light-based works predominated – like Hannah Whitfield’s beautiful lightbox, or Ante Germane’s interactive seat which lit up with red LEDs as you unwittingly sat to watch a screen in which disembodied hands paint a brick pastel colours. My installation consisted of two PICO projectors shining onto rear-projection material tied into an enclosed space within the greenhouse. It was then possible to crawl inside this space, grazing past the astroturfed floor and gazing up into the mirrored ceiling.

The video that was projecting in duplicate I also made in After Effects – consisting of a psychedelic “garden” accompanied by semi-coherent quotes from the old sci-fi film Brazil. I let the camera pan through autonomously and reveal the 2D/3D structure’s construction, as a lot of my practice deals with ideas around illusion, personalised universes and object oriented ontology. What is a machine, and how would it construct a garden, if it could or would conceive of it?

Third years are supposed to have a plan. For our degree show, perhaps, or life after art school. I watched a semi-satirical video the other day that declared that as art students, we go into art school wanting to make good art. Art school turns around and asks, but what is art, what is good, and what is making? I’m not sure I can answer any of those questions, but as it turns out, it might be more important to pose a question than to answer it.

Where we go, no one knows. You might find out by coming to this year’s Chelsea BA Fine Art degree show in June 2015, where we will be laying down three years of questions, and the foundation of our hard work.

After all, they seem to know where they are going, the ones who walk away from Omelas.

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Student Profile – George Sydney Selwyn Brace, BA Graphic Design Communication

George Sydney Selwyn Brace by Gavin Freeborn

George Sydney Selwyn Brace by Gavin Freeborn

George Selwyn Brace, third year student originally from Kingston-Upon-Thames, London, took time out from his busy schedule to have a chat with us about life as a student on BA Graphic Design Communication. George originally studied one year of a BA in Philosophy in Aberdeen before moving to the CCW Foundation in Art & Design at Camberwell and then then BA Graphic Design Communication at Chelsea. Here’s a few of his thoughts on his past, present and future.

 Describe your Chelsea experience in 3 words?

Externalise, Criticise & Enjoy!

 What do you enjoy most about studying at Chelsea?

The experimental and mistake making culture which leads to true learning as opposed to learning only for the sake of passing exams.

Discrete Selection by George Sydney Selwyn Brace

Discrete Selection by George Sydney Selwyn Brace

 How are you enjoying living in London?

I love it! It’s the best place to study design!

 Where do you live?

Peckham, Southeast London.

 What’s your neighbourhood like?

Great…it’s a really exciting mix of creative and social.

See, Think, Make by George Sydney Selwyn Brace

See, Think, Make by George Sydney Selwyn Brace

 What has been your greatest challenge so far on the course and how have you overcome it?

Developing a practice that’s both outward looking and self-reflective at the same time. Learning how to harness the positivity of myself and others professionally.

What are your greatest achievements/awards/exhibitions?

Making the proactive choice to move from my BA in Philosophy to art school where I have really learned how to positively challenge myself and others.

A personal highlight has been my work as a student ambassador, especially for widening participation events. This work has become a central part of my portfolio and positively informed my professional experience.

In summer 2014 I worked as a junior intern at It’s Nice That (INT Works) and as a design assistant at Hole & Corner magazine. My experience mentoring and working with widening participation students facilitated me in developing the confidence to work critically in the design industry.

What do you see yourself doing after your studies?

My aim is to be a creative within a team, working on the art direction of projects, continuing my development through widening participation, It’s Nice That and Hole & Corner.

And lastly, what would you say to anyone thinking of doing your course?

Come to an open day to get your head around the methodology of the course and ask plenty of questions.

Follow George and his creative path on his website.

 

 

Student Profile – Eleanore Booth, BA Fine Art

 

Image courtesy of the artist Eleanore Booth

Image courtesy of the artist Eleanore Booth

Busy in the midst of her third year of BA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts, Ellie Booth paused to reflect on how the course has helped develop her practice and the learning the intricacies of time management.

Describe your Chelsea experience in three words:

Inspiring, exciting and challenging.

What do you enjoy most about studying at Chelsea?

I enjoy the opportunities at Chelsea available for every student, as well as the wonderful studio spaces.

How do you enjoy living in London?

I commute in to Chelsea every day from Hastings on the coast outside London. I utilise my commuting time to write and experiment with ideas, whilst being able to get involved with the opportunities London has to offer.

What was your greatest challenge on the course and how did you overcome it?

My greatest challenge has been balancing dissertation writing with my practice. I love to become engrossed in my writing, but then find my practical work gets neglected. I then stop writing to focus on making work but then get so consumed by this that my dissertation starts to get left behind. I have overcome this vicious circle by managing my time properly. I designate equal time slots to both aspects of my practice to make sure both are being work on in equal amounts.

Image courtesy of the artist Eleanore Booth

Image courtesy of the artist Eleanore Booth

What do you intend on doing after you finish the course?

I will continue creating work outside of an educational environment but I am also thinking about doing a Masters in the future.

And lastly, what do you want to tell people who are thinking about doing this course?

The course teaches you the value and importance of your own practice. Chelsea’s Fine Art course enables your own practice to develop in both approach and presentation. This isn’t handed to you – the tutors do not tell you what to do next or what not to pursue – but instead provide a platform for discussing development and creating exciting work.

Image courtesy of the artist Eleanore Booth

Image courtesy of the artist Eleanore Booth

Student Profile – Andrew Illman, BA Textile Design

Andrew Illman by Gavin Freeborn

Andrew Illman by Gavin Freeborn

Andrew Illman - Colour Project "Sports"

Andrew Illman – Colour Project “Sports”

This morning we caught up with 2nd year BA Textile Design student Andrew Illman, originally from Cirencester, Gloucestershire, England. It was great opportunity to experience life through the eyes of a young male textile designer at Chelsea.

Describe your Chelsea experience in 3 words?

Challenging, Diverse & Focused

What do you enjoy most about studying at Chelsea?

Having the flexibility to take my projects in different directions including working with wood, ceramics, and laser-cutting in Chelsea’s wonderful 3D workshops, so I’m not just tied to pure textiles.

Andrew Illman - Concept Boards

Andrew Illman – Concept Boards

Where do you live in London and what’s your neighbourhood like?

I live in Farringdon which is very central and a great base to reach Chelsea as well as the libraries I have access to do research in at London College of Fashion and Central St Martins. Having access to all UAL’s libraries is a great resource.

Farringdon is a design industry neighbourhood and is especially exciting during Clerkenwell Design Week. It’s a popular area as a film set, with Game of Thrones crew at Clerkenwell Green the other day. We also have the vibrant Smithfield Market on our doorstep but you’d have to be up at 5am to see that in full flow!

Andrew Illman in his Studio at Chelsea by Gavin Freeborn

Andrew Illman in his Studio at Chelsea by Gavin Freeborn

What has been your greatest challenge so far on the course and how have you overcome it?

Time Management as the course is very self-led and you meet your tutor once a week. I write a lot of notes and make to do lists over and over again.

What are your greatest achievements/awards/exhibitions?

With every project I improve my skills and the recent colour project was my favourite so far. Learning the process of dyeing and how colour behaves on different textures was fascinating.

I had the idea to look to colours and textures of buildings and industrial skips. Then I incorporated these colours into print designs for footwear.

Andrew Illman - Research from buildings and industrial skips

Andrew Illman – Research from buildings and industrial skips

What do you see yourself doing after your studies?

I aim to do my MA in Textile Design at Chelsea or possibly Fashion at CSM. The advantages of progressing onto the MA here are that I already know the college intimately and have strong working relationships the technicians. Chelsea has a deeply practical approach that teaches you skills which will be very useful in industry.

And lastly, what would you say to anyone thinking of doing your course?

People here at Chelsea are lovely, the atmosphere and Chelsea vibe is great, it’s an easy place to be creative and the tutors are very knowledgeable with and diverse in their practice and research.

Follow Andrew’s work on his website www.andrewgraeme.com

 

Sam Hopkins celebrated as ‘Leading Global Thinker’ of 2014

Sam Hopkins at the Global Thinkers 2014 awards ceremony in Washington DC> Photo courtesy: Dakota Fine/Foreign Policy Magazine

Sam Hopkins (on the right) at the Global Thinkers 2014 awards ceremony in Washington DC> Photo courtesy: Dakota Fine/Foreign Policy Magazine

Sam Hopkins, artist and PhD student in the Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon (CCW) Graduate School was this month awarded the title of ‘Leading Global Thinker of 2014′ by the magazine Foreign Policy.  Awarded annually, the title is given to 100 “remarkable individuals [who] smashed the world as we know it – for better and for worse” (according to their website), and Hopkins was nominated in this list for his work ‘Logos of Non Profit Organisations working in Kenya (some of which are imaginary) 2010-‘ which I showed at this years Dakar Biennale.  He collected his award on 17 November in Washington DC at a ceremony .

We interviewed him when he returned to the UK to find out more about his work, growing up in Kenya and his thoughts on being celebrated alongside Angela Merkel and the leader of Boko Harem.

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Interior Spatial Design students create contemporary designs from Victorian tiles

3D rendering of design by Amy Lofts entitled Motion Blur.

3D rendering of design by Amy Lofts entitled Motion Blur.

Opening tonight, Chelsea BA Interior Spatial Design students will be exhibiting their contemporary floor designs using  Victorian-style geometric tiles.

The exhibition, THRESHOLD*, opens at the Original Features shop in Crouch End, and is the result of a challenge by the company for students to re-imagine the work of their nineteenth century forebears andcreate a fresh, exciting tile design using their range of traditional tiles.

Design by Sy-An Chen entitled Extension.  This design uses the basic shape of a triangle to assemble a large textured form that uses colour and shape to create a feeling of extending and reaching outwards.

Design by Sy-An Chen entitled Extension. This design uses the basic shape of a triangle to assemble a large textured form that uses colour and shape to create a feeling of extending and reaching outwards.

The result was a collection of 26 new designs inspired by the complex and colourful tiled floors and pathways of nineteenth century Britain.Judges and the public have voted for their favorite design and the two winners will be made up by one of Original Features’s professional tilers.  All of the designs will be on display in the Original Features Gallery as part of  the exhibition and will be on show until the new year.
Some of the students designs are shown here, but you can read all about it and see each of the students’  designs on the Original Features website.

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Roboz Trust awards £8,500 to two MA Fine Art students

James Pimperton, recipient of one of this year's Zsuzi Roboz Trust awards and Donald Smith, Director of Chelsea Space, at Chelsea College of Arts in October 2014.  Photo by Gavin Freeborn.

James Pimperton, recipient of one of this year’s Zsuzi Roboz Trust awards and Donald Smith, Director of Exhibitions, Chelsea Space, at Chelsea College of Arts in October 2014.

MA Fine Art students Georgina Nicolaou and James Pimperton were this year awarded £8,500 each to pay for their MA fees, funded by the Zsuzi Roboz Turst through the Chelsea Arts Club.

The first awards of their kind from the Roboz Trust, they were set up in the name of renowned portrait painter and ‘lively Bohemian character’ Zsuzi Roboz to support two home or EU MA Fine Art students with a special interest in painting, especially as numbers of students progressing into postgraduate study nationally are falling.

We interviewed recipient James Pimperton about his work and the impact he hopes that postgraduate study will have on his practice.

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